Maurice > Maurice: Other

Blenheim-National Advantages

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kac:
Next month, we're going to be doing Blenheim, and I thought it would be good to solicit thoughts on National Advantages.

We will have four players. We are considering having one English, one Dutch, one French and one Bavarian.

My initial thoughts, and I would love comment:

English: Lethal Volleys, Great Captain
Dutch:Lethal Volleys
French:Maison du Roi, Ó la Ba´onette!, En Masse
Bavarian: En Masse

Any thoughts or suggestions?

mfarl2001:
Im just wondering about En Masse for the French n Bavarians. That strikes me as more for your Jacobites, Hoards of Eastern Rabble and Sans-culottes. I dont think that The French, their allies the Bavarians fought that drastically diffrent.

kac:
I certainly appreciate your feedback.

My thought is that in an attempt to reflect the deeper formations of the older, rank systems, we are considering that the thinner (and wider) British and Dutch platoon firers would get Lethal Volleys, while the deeper units of their opponents would get Ó la Baionette and en Masse, obviously encouraging them not to shoot it out, but rather get right in there and mix it up with close combat.

I'm kind of in the mindset currently that National Advantages are very match-up specific, to emphasize (caricature?) the differences between the opposing armies, as in giving the Prussians cadence in 1740 but not in 1758 to reflect the differences, not any actual loss of ability.

So my thought process is just to highlight the doctrinal differences.

Too much?

mfarl2001:
I think so, True the English fought in the Dutch system with men in three Ranks. The French using their own four (sometimes five) ranks of men. But I think they arnt that drastically diffrent as say covering half the frontage. I think the Lethal Volleys covers the better control the Dutch system the officers and NCO's had to keep muskets level.

kac:
You may well be right.

I would note, however, the diagram on p. 118 of Chandler, The Art of Warfare in the Age of Marlborough, New York, 1976, which indicates typical frontages of 810 feet for a British battalion of 1709 and a frontage of 486 feet for a comparable and contemporary French battalion.

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